What, When, Where: Sparkle and Shine

September 5, 2011

By Erin Marvin

We all know what this means:

Someone has either done something really good or really bad, and whatever delightful bauble is tucked inside this iconic blue box is meant as apology or praise.

We don’t, however, need such excuses to bedeck our homes in gilt and glamour. Just as a dazzling new bracelet or shimmering set of earrings can make you feel like a whole new person, adding some sparkle and shine to your decor can really dress things up.

An easy way to add a little “bling†to your abode would be with a few of these Etch candle holders from Tom Dixon. (Just one is never enough.)

The octagonal shape and glass top of this vintage French cocktail from BG Galleries reminds us that diamonds are a girl’s–and perhaps a sitting or living room’s–best friend.

Of course, when it comes to sparkle you can’t go wrong with Swarovski (though sometimes you can go over the top). Here are a few pieces from the Crystal Palace Collection:

And, because I can’t resist pretty things, here’s another hanging pendant from the Swarovski Architecture line:

Even sinks are bejeweled these days; take a look at this ladylike vessel from Linkasink:

For something a little more subtle, try these beautiful gold and silver leaf tiebacks from Brimar‘s Versailles Collection:

Silver and bronze relief makes for a pretty focal point, such as the Pompadour fabrics from Osborne and Little.

Adding a little glitter or shine to a home can happen in all sorts of unexpected places. Here’s a sneak peak from an Anthony Como-designed house we plan to feature in the spring. Homes Editor Stacy Kunstel likens the draperies in the master bathroom to “sheer hosiery with sparkly thick trim.â€

Photo by Robert Benson

And just how do individual eye-catching pieces transform a room? This dining room by Cindy Rinfret has it all–a gold mirror, crystal chandelier and colored glassware–and it comes together perfectly.

Photo by Michael Partenio; click to see more

And I’d be remiss not to include this grand Brookline estate, designed by Eugene Lawrence. The interiors hark back to the Gilded Age, when most every surface glittered.

Photo by Bruce Buck; click to see more