Friday Favorites 10/25/2013

October 25, 2013

Cheryl Katz, Contributing Editor 

The jewelry designer Michele Mercaldo has been an admirer of the artist Robert Kobayashi since she first noticed a small sculpture in the window of Moe’s Meat Market at 237 Elizabeth Street in New York’s NoLIta neighborhood. After a bit of investigation, Mercaldo learned that the sculpture was Mr. Kobayashi’s work and that the unprepossessing building was the artist’s work/live/gallery space.

It is there, using pounded metal repurposed from tin ceilings and small nails, that the artist creates his Metal Clouage pieces.

If it weren’t for Mercaldo and her savvy observations, we Bostonians might have missed the 87-year-old artist’s work. But, luckily for us, he accepted her invitation to exhibit at her eponymous jewelry shop in Boston’s South End.

Mercaldo’s affinity for Kobayashi’s work comes as no surprise. Hanging on the walls of her shop, next to the cases of her finely crafted jewelry, it’s clear that the pair are kindred spirits.

Robert Kobayashi: Metal Clouage
Michele Mercaldo Jewelry
276 Shawmut Avenue, Boston
The exhibit runs through Nov. 24, 2013

Kyle Hoepner, Editor-in-Chief

Just following up on my quick mention a few weeks back of the Museum of Fine Arts Boston’s new Art of the English Regency Gallery. I finally made it in for a look this past weekend, and there are indeed some impressive pieces sitting in state in the formally draped, Pompeian red room.

Thomas Hope: Tripod stand; mahogany (about 1802). Collection of Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, gift of Horace Wood Brock. Photo © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

After Thomas Hope: Griffin wall light; beech and lime wood, painted to simulate bronze (about 1802). Collection of Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, gift of Horace Wood Brock in memory of Norna “Miki” Sarofim. Photo © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Attributed to George Bullock: Cabinet; laburnum, ebony, with brass inlay; gilt-bronze mounts; brass grille; rouge griotte marble top of later date (about 1815). Collection of Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, gift of Horace Wood Brock. Photo © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

There’s no substitute for experiencing the gallery in real life, of course. But if making the trip would be difficult or impossible, the MFA now has an interactive 360-degree tour on their website (at the link above) that will give you a somewhat distant glimpse of the goodies on display.

By the way, if you do visit soon in person I’d highly recommend popping in across the hall for a glance or two at Piero della Francesca’s Senigallia Madonna, temporarily in residence.