Deb Barrett: Market Report from the Spring European Design Shows, Part Two

Editor’s note: Today we continue with part two of Deb Barrett’s report on the trends she spotted at the European spring design shows. If you missed part one of her report last week, you can read it here.

Baroque
Baroque designs, such as arabesques or medallions and border designs, show up on textiles and surfaces and in accessories as well. Elaborate, ornamental inspiration from a range of cultures and regions is more sophisticated than existing ethnic looks.

casaro fabrics

Photo courtesy of Casssaro Fabrics

baroque velvet fabric

Photo by Deb Barrett

Shannon Koszyk

Jewelry designer Shannon Koszyk uses parts, pieces, and findings to embellish chandeliers in her new collection for Currey & Company. Photo courtesy of Currey & Company

Warm Metals
Playing nicely off these baroque tendencies, metals are warming up. Gold is king, brass is back, and rose-colored metals and copper are important. This palette mixes dark, industrial wrought iron and bronzes with peachy-tinted warm metals to soften the hard edges. Oversized or beautifully sculpted hardware on case goods makes dramatic statements. Mirrors and glass (especially black glass) that reflect these metals are de rigeur.

mambo

The Carousel Suspension Lamp is a five-lampshade light supported by an iron structure with copper shades. Photo courtesy of Mambo Unlimited

walcot

Warm, metallic papers wrap these drapery poles by Walcot House and add sparkle at the window. Photo courtesy of Walcot House

fernini chest

Fertini Chest. Photo courtesy of Maison & Objet

roberto cavalli

Roberto Cavalli display. Photo by Deb Barrett

kelly wearstler for groundworks

Photo courtesy of Kelly Wearstler for Groundworks

tom dixon

New accessory collection by Maison & Objet Designer of the Year Tom Dixon. Photo courtesy of Tom Dixon

Heavily Embellished
Today’s embellishments are three dimensional and very pronounced. More and more products have relief-like, structured surfaces dripping with details that are created through new technologies and traditional approaches alike. Techniques are a mashup of methods such as appliqué, embroidery, cross-stitch, and hand painting, all playing on the authentic artisan trend. These traditional decoration methods have new life when taken out of context and reapplied. Tapestries and macramé are also being revived in fresh ways. Tassel fringe is popular, as well the creation of movement and interplay between light and shade.

embellished fabric

Photo by Deb Barrett

beaded embellished fabric

Photo by Deb Barrett

pierre frey

Photo by Deb Barrett

verald beval

Photo courtesy of Paris Deco Off

holland and sherry

Photo by Deb Barrett

Under Glass
Finally, I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention a huge accessory trend that I noted as I walked the aisles. Common objects, souvenirs, and natural materials were introduced in their raw state, either encased, protected by, or suspended in glass, or tucked under cloches.

Photo by Deb Barrett

—Deb Barrett

Deb Barrett is an award-winning designer who has built a reputation as a window covering expert, professional speaker, trend consultant, and author. She is the principal in Window Dressings, Inc., a couture window treatment and soft furnishings firm near Chicago. She is heading back to Europe for Decorex 2014 as leader of an IDS tour of the event. Details about the tour can be found on Deb’s website.

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